Political prisoner Khalfani Malik Khaldun puts the Indiana prison system on trial

December 29, 2012

Since Dec. 13, 1994, Indiana political prisoner Khalfani Malik Khaldun (aka Leonard McQuay) has been held in control units, i.e. administrative segregation or isolation. It began when police and prison investigators manufactured a murder charge against him after a guard was stabbed and killed. Brother Khalfani is a Muslim and New Afrikan revolutionary educator who professes a strong sense of radical politics and culture.

Interview by the Campaign to Free Khalfani Malik Khaldun
Khalfani Malik Khaldun 042711
Campaign: How long have you been in Indiana’s prison plantation?
Khalfani Malik Khaldun: I entered the Indiana Department of Corrections in 1987, when I was a senior in high school.

Campaign: How old are you?
KMK: I was born Nov. 30, 1969. That makes me 43 years old.

Campaign: Explain to us what your life is like on the inside?
KMK: The best way to describe it is I am in prison sanctioned to indefinite solitary confinement engaged in multiple fights. One fight to regain my freedom, one fight to maintain my physical health, one fight to be released into the general population, and the last fight is to maintain my sanity – an all-day job.

Campaign: How has your activism made you a target for harassment or repression?
KMK: Being identified as a prison leader, political agitator, activist or revolutionary, we get automatically singled out as threats to others and threats to the safety and security of the prison plantations. Having been restricted from general population for so long, my influence has been reduced to small units. The idea behind all this is to destroy our ties and relationships with comrades and new youth coming in.

Campaign: Share your position on the political nature of your murder charge involving that prison guard, Phillip Curry.
KMK: On Dec. 13, 1994, the night this guard was killed at the Indiana State Prison, he was killed on the tier above where I lived. D-cell-house was where the prisoncrats housed the worst of the worst – their term, not mine. I was at that time agitating, educating and organizing the radical elements who would listen.
So when this happened, having been a thorn in the prisoncrats’ side already, they made me the responsible party that night; they were mad and wanted someone to pay. In 2001, they made me pay by finding me guilty and giving me a fresh 60-year hit.

One of the jurors who found me guilty, Juror No. 12, came forward after my trial; she regretted her actions and went to the judge. Instead of calling for a new trial and reversal of the charge, the judge told her to go home; the judge has since retired. They manufactured evidence to obtain their conviction against me.
I am in prison sanctioned to indefinite solitary confinement engaged in multiple fights. One fight to regain my freedom, one fight to maintain my physical health, one fight to be released into the general population, and the last fight is to maintain my sanity – an all-day job.

Campaign: Explain the corruption that exists inside Indiana’s criminal justice system.
KMK: Like any system of corrupt politicians and abuses of power, whoever can afford to pay a greedy lawyer to represent them here may stay out of prison. These lawyers have judges and prosecutors who will give one a pass as long as they receive a nice payoff.

Poor people get sent to prison to fulfill the schemes of the prisoncrats and political regime here; more bodies mean more money. As they say, power corrupts, but absolute power corrupts absolutely.

Indiana legislators have slashed prison funding for educating prisoners and providing meaningful rehabilitative programs, so that money would be solely for building new prisons. So they are perpetuating a system that leads to more recidivism. Not having a viable re-entry program for prisoners prior to their release ensures a return to prison: capitalism at its best and the human exploitation of prisoners.

Campaign: Why are they continuing to house you in solitary confinement after nearly two decades?
KMK: The executive body of the Indiana Department of Corrections launched its political war against me in 1994, the night they lost one of their own. Being the only person accused, then later charged and convicted for this murder, to them Khalfani Malik Khaldun is Indiana’s public enemy number one; so they have condemned me to a prison existence in solitary confinement.

This goes beyond my sentence of 60 years. The courts did not say serve out this term in administrative segregation. The Indiana Department of Corrections wants payback, so in retaliation they want me suffering to the point of psychological incapacitation. They want me an old grey-hair grey-beard and no longer imposing a potential threat.

I am currently “conduct clear” for eight years, and I have completed the following programs: Substance Abuse; Stress Management; Anger Management; Commitment to Change; Prison-Life Skills; Parenting; Cage Your Rage; Rage, Recidivism and Recovery; Prison-Life Skills No. 2; Houses of Healing; Bridging the Gap; and Inside-Outside Dads.

I have been eligible for release to general population for years now. Their justification for not releasing me is they say I killed their officer, and nobody is comfortable with signing off on my release from solitary confinement.

Campaign: Why is it so important to build a networking support base on the outside of prison?
KMK: For the revolutionary, political prisoner, jailhouse lawyer, prison activist, outside resources and support is crucial. The prisoncrats isolate us to control our movements and neutralize our influence on other convicts.

Having a network of loyal people who have your best interests in mind helps to keep the public informed. These supporters can be family members, friends or anyone doing prisoner support work. They can help us expose whatever ill treatment we go through. When the prisoncrats know you have people who genuinely love and care about you, they’re less likely to openly mess you around.

Campaign: Explain how the Indiana Department of Corrections utilizes control units and why?
KMK: In the early 1980s, Indiana experienced several prison riots as a result of racism and brutality by guards on militant aspiring revolutionaries and lumpen proletariat prisoners, forcing prisoners to take a stand to defend themselves. Indiana prisoncrats learned some lessons from these insurrections – and one lesson was that there was a threat to the Indiana Department of Corrections posed by politically-unified convicts.

Indiana prisoncrats lobbied for funds to build two solitary confinement units here in response to the rebellion of militancy from convicts willing to sacrifice for change. 

In 1991, the Indiana Supermax was built, a control unit meant to be a tool of social control of the state’s most violent prisoners.

In 1993, the prisoncrats built the Secured Housing Unit (SHU), a unit styled after the SHU at Pelican Bay State Prison.

Both units were meant to cut the prisoners off from normal prison relations, while helping to keep the prisoners in the general population sort of in check. No one wants to spend unlimited years in Administrative Segregation, or solitary confinement.

The fear of being held in these units creates snitches who will tell prisoncrats whatever to stay in population. You may read about these units by going to the Human Rights Watch report, “Cold Storage: Super-Maximum Security Confinement inIndiana.” Amnesty International just released a 68-page report called “The Edgeof Endurance,” exposing solitary confinement in California.

Campaign: How important is it to stay in touch with your loved ones?
KMK: Doing time is like having cannibals eat away at your flesh day by day. Family love and their help to assist us in maintaining are paramount. I am a conscious, self-educated New Afrikan (Black) man who loves myself and those who love me. That connection helps to keep me determined, motivated and hopeful in times of sadness and loss of loved ones.

Since 1997, I have lost my mother, two brothers, an uncle and two cousins. I am fighting for my life, unable to cry, mourn or be a comfort to my family. Since 1994, my loved ones have been harassed, intimidated, threatened and discouraged by prisoncrats to not visit or write me at times. I have not had a contact visit since 2000. We continue to persevere through it all – because it is necessary.

Campaign: How do you work to maintain your health both mentally and physically?
KMK: For years I have maintained a consistent physical exercise routine and a healthy study habit of reading quality books and magazines. I don’t eat pork, and that’s been since 1987. I stopped eating red meat for 15 years; I recently started back eating it. Exercise and study has kept me active and healthy for many years.
One realistic fact that I want to share is no one leaves these experiences the same as they were when they came in. I am scarred by anxiety, depression, paranoia and hypertension as a result of being in long term isolation so many years.

I have made a conscious effort to humble myself and be less reactionary in emotional situations. This way these prisoncrats won’t have any ammunition to use to justify keeping me in solitary confinement. As long as I am living, I’m going to keep on fighting.

Campaign: How long did they keep you on the SCU – Special Confinement Unit?
KMK: Prisoncrats sent me to the SCU unit way in January 2003, and I spent 10 years in that windowless torture chamber. For the most part, that is one of Indiana’s most racist prisons, and the staff are 98 percent all-white with this philosophy of Southern racism.

That was the worst 10 years of my 26 years in prison. Altogether now I have 18 years straight in units of solitary confinement. They have tried to break my will to be defiant and destroy my mental faculties. Allah has guided me out of each storm. Allah-u-Akbar.

Campaign: What do you think prompted the prisoncrats to finally transfer you out on April 18, 2012?
KMK: A variety of reasons, but one in particular is my constant pursuits in civil court. On April 4, 2012, I filed with the court a motion for an immediate permanent injunctive relief judgment and a memorandum of law requesting the court to order the Indiana Department of Corrections to release me to general population. These prisoncrats moved me 14 days later to Pendleton Correctional Facility.

This in my opinion was done to get me out of their custody so I wouldn’t be a problem any longer. I had been challenging my department-wide solitary confinement status for years. The classification supervisor and superintendent also refused to release me in 2010, when I had completed a program serving as re-entry back to population. That ACT Program is an incentive for release. They released my entire class but not me.
Photo: Indiana’s Pendleton Correctional Facility was built in 1923.

Campaign: What are the conditions like at Pendleton Correctional Facility?
KMK: The transfer on April 18, 2012, out of the SCU to Pendleton did not land me in general population. Right now the general population is run like a concentration camp with fences and cameras everywhere; the whole prison is “controlled movement.”

The prisoncrats placed me on DWAS, Department-Wide Administrative Segregation. Inside G-cell-house, where all the potential threats and alleged troublemakers are housed, D-block is where all disciplinary segregation prisoners are housed. Also, C-block, where I am held, houses prisoners on Facility Administrative Segregation and prisoners on DWAS, Department-Wide Administrative Segregation, the status I am on.

DWAS are all single-man cells, with recreation one hour a day and 23 hours locked in a cell. We get recreation on Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sundays, showering only on Monday, Wednesday and Fridays. The only interaction we get is during recreation outside when we’re in the dog-run individual cages.

Campaign: Since your arrival at Pendleton, have any officials discussed with you your possible release from that status?
KMK: The prisoncrats are seriously playing games. Superintendent Keith Butts, who recently retired, sent me a letter claiming he would set up a plan to consider my release from DWAS status, but it was all a smokescreen to get me to ease up on my demands to be treated like the rest of these prisoners who are being released. They are picking and choosing and playing prison politics with our lives.

The current regime in the commissioner’s office at the Indiana Department of Corrections are not willing to give me a chance to prove them wrong. That is, if they released me and I transitioned without incident, they will not be able to say “That’s the bad guy” no more. There is no legitimate justification for my still being held captive in these units.

Campaign: How can people outside that are interested in helping you join the campaign to help free you? How can you benefit from their support?
KMK: Having been in prison since 1987, I have had the misfortune to lose family, friends; and my ties to relationships I’ve had with my female companions I have had to rebuild, which hasn’t been easy, then establish an extended family.

Right now, I need someone who is computer-savvy who can network with organizations to encourage them to take on my case. I need a website on Facebook that solely covers my entire case, and we need a law firm that assists political prisoners that is activist-conscious. We also need someone qualified and good with fundraising.

My success with Indiana lawyers haven’t been great. They seem to be afraid to go up against the Indiana Department of Corrections and the lawyers from the Indiana Attorney General’s Office. We must find a lawyer out of state who can practice in the state of Indiana.

Those wanting to join this campaign to assist me in my freedom, please write me directly and we’ll go from there; honestly, we need all the willing working bodies we can get on this campaign.

Right now, I need someone who is computer-savvy who can network with organizations to encourage them to take on my case. I need a website on Facebook that solely covers my entire case, and we need a law firm that assists political prisoners that is activist-conscious. We also need someone qualified and good with fundraising.

Campaign: How is your civil and criminal fight coming along in the politics of the Indiana Court System?
KMK: On Jan. 11, 2013, I have a hearing on my civil law suit challenging my continued confinement by the Indiana Department of Corrections. I filed several motions pro se that will be covering primarily my request for the court to order my release to general population.

My criminal murder case is currently at a standstill, and my initial post-conviction appeal was denied, because the Public Defender’s Office gave me an attorney who felt I was guilty and I should do my time. He messed my case up.

I am preparing a successive post-conviction relief petition. My rights are being violated civilly and criminally, and I will never relent nor lose my self-determination to fight.

Campaign: Any final words you want to share with the public and the revolutionary community?
KMK: I can honestly say that Indiana as far as prisoners abandoning their criminal mentalities and transforming to political consciousness goes, our “think tanks,” we’re very aggressive in producing politically-active prisoners, but we seem to have lost our momentum somewhere.

Prisoners are still studying and having individual dialogues, and I think prisoners, in an attempt to avoid being captured and held for 10-20 years in solitary confinement, are becoming less vocal and active. My having been held for the past 18 years is their prime example of where they don’t want to be.

To me, life is not easy, never has been, and to struggle means to reject being the victim. One who struggles is a rejuvenated fighter life-long. We are organized, prepared and multi-talented. To struggle is to understand complexity and to pick one’s own battles. There cannot be fruitful progress without a real struggle. I am not broken by my adversity, but I am experiencing psychological fatigue. A luta continua.

Send our brother some love and light: Khalfani Malik Khaldun (Leonard McQuay), 874304, Pendleton Correctional Facility, GCH 17/2C, 4490 W. Reformatory Road, Pendleton, IN 46064.
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Letter to Mr Rick Raemisch, Secretary of Wi Department of Corrections, about Steven Stewart

This letter was sent recently to the Secretary of Wisconsin Department of Corrections, to point out some new abuses and unhelpful acts by staff. We recently heard as well that Steven has another infection. Steven needs to be paroled and cared for at home, so that he can get his life back, after having been in prison for 23 years while not having carried out the crime for which he was convicted, more than 10 of which have been spent in solitary confinement.

To: Mr. Rick Raemisch, Secretary
Wisconsin Department of Corrections
3099 East Washington Avenue
P.O. Box 7925
Madison, WI 53707-7925
USA

March 2nd, 2010

Dear Mr Raemisch,

My name is A.P., I am a friend of a prisoner in Wisconsin called Steven D. Stewart (DOC # 143599, held in WSPF) since at least 4 years, and I visited him last year from Holland.Mr Steven Stewart has a serious illness: MS, and many physical complaints stemming from that, as well as from being locked up in solitary confinement since many years, I mean 14 years. Mr Stewart will see the parole board again for the second time in May of this year. He is very ill and it is time that the facts are faced by the department of corrections: that he is no threat to anyone, he badly needs medical care, and he needs to be on his way out towards rehabilitation.

Instead, on Jan 31st or Feb 6th, Mr Stewart was locked in a “stripcage” for 3 hours, all his mail was taken, and now he is in another cell with no other prisoner near to have any contact with. Staff at WSPF tell him he has mail, yet they do not bring it to him.Why is Mr Stewart being treated so roughly? Why is he not being treated for his rectal prolapse? What if he dies in that cell, will you claim responsibility for his lack of medical care? What will you tell his family? Why has Mr Stewart been inundated with conduct reports ever since he spoke out against being mistreated in 2005? Surely the way Mr Stewart has been treated has nothing to do with “corrections”?

I hope that you can provide the answers to these questions I have, since I do not understand how this very ill man can be in a supermax prison for years on end with no program to help him out of there, nor any meaningful medical care. People who support Mr Stewart on the outside have for years tried to get medical care for Mr Stewart, and to get him to a more appropriate level of incarceration for someone with complex medical illness. Yet, our calls have gone unnoticed it seems. Mr Stewart still has no medical care and he is still being kept in a place where he could die at any time, because he has infections that are precarious in his situation.

Also, he receives psychological and physical harassment on a daily basis. How much can a person take? The judge did not order the state to have Mr Stewart undergo such torture on top of being incarcerated.Thank you for your time in listening to me. I hope you will ensure the safety, dignity, respect and care that Mr Steven Stewart (and all those who are being held in prisons under your supervision) is entitled to as a fellow human being.

Yours faithfully,
A. P.
Address: …The Netherlands

Cc: Steven D. Stewart, #143599
ACLU Wisconsin
Humanity for Prisoners, Michigan

Perpetrators and enablers of torture in the U.S.

This article is from the SF Bay View
Posted By blockreportradio On November 1, 2009

by Corey Weinstein, M.D., C.C.H.P

Photo:

Anthony Hall, 18, spends 23 hours per day in this cell in the supermax prison in Boscobel, Wisc. Judging from letters to the Bay View from prisons throughout the country, Boscobel seems to be one of the worst for Black prisoners. Prison officials there have often refused to deliver the Bay View to subscribers on the excuse that it would “incite a riot.” –
Photo: Andy Manis, AP

During the past 25 years I’ve spent a lot of time with survivors of torture, men and women enduring long term solitary confinement in California’s prisons. They are the most urgent victims of U.S. mass incarceration with its overcrowded facilities and policy of incapacitation, not rehabilitation.

Those thousands held in solitary for years on end report the expected classic symptoms of psychic disturbance, mental deterioration and social disruption. As described by various penal psychiatric experts, the symptoms of this syndrome include massive free-floating anxiety, hyperresponsiveness to external stimuli, perceptual distortions and hallucinations, a feeling of unreality, difficulty with concentration and memory, acute confusional states, the emergence of primitive aggressive fantasies, persecutory ideation, motor excitement and violent destructive or self-mutilatory outbursts.

The degrading conditions produce behaviors ranging from fights among prisoners to assaults on staff, assaults by staff, excrement throwing, self mutilation and contract killings. Isolation tears apart family and friendship ties, creating social dislocation.

In California there are about 4,000 men and women held in the state’s supermax facilities, called Security Housing Units, including 600 serving SHU terms in Administrative Segregation. That is 2.5 percent of the total population of 160,000.

The regime in SHU is a 23.5 hour per day lockdown in the 8’ x 10’ cell with no communal activities aside from small group exercise yards for some. There is no work, no school, no communal worship and meals are eaten in cell.

TVs and radios must be purchased, so the poor have none. Visits are noncontact, behind glass and limited to one or two hours on each weekend visit day. Each prisoner must submit to being handcuffed behind the back in order to exit the cell. Leg iron hobble chains are commonly used.
More than 50 percent of the men in SHU are assigned indeterminate terms there because of alleged gang membership or activity. The only program that the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCr) offers to them is to debrief.

The single way offered to earn their way out of SHU is to tell departmental gang investigators everything they know about gang membership and activities, including describing crimes they have committed. The department calls it debriefing. The prisoners call it “snitch, parole or die.” The only ways out are to snitch, finish the prison term or die. The protection against self incrimination is collapsed in the service of anti-gang investigation.

CDCr asserts that the lockdown and snitch policy are required for the safety and security of the institution. Having legitimate penalogical purpose, the SHU program is deemed worth any harm done to the prisoners.

California prisons continue to have a high rate of assaultive incidents among prisoners and from prisoners to staff. There is no proof or even any study that demonstrates that these measures are effective anti-gang measures. They appear to be no more useful than previous brutalities like that unleashed at Corcoran prison more than a decade ago.

Between 1988 and 1995, CDCr ran a program at the Corcoran SHU called the Integrated Yard Policy. Rival gang members were deliberately mixed together in small group exercise yards. The prisoners had to fight, and fight well or be punished by their own gangs.

When the fights occurred, guards were required to fire first anti-riot guns and then assault rifles at the combatants. Seven prisoners were killed and hundreds wounded. The program of beating prisoners down into the concrete with gunfire resulted in bigger, stronger gangs with new martyrs and heroes.
Mayhem and violence was added to the prison social system by departmental policy. No CDCr official has ever been held accountable or even assigned responsibility for what was know at Corcoran as the gladiator days. Line staff brought to trial by the U.S. Department of Justice avoided criminal convictions by proving that they were just following orders.

There are four prisons in California with SHUs: Corcoran, Pelican Bay and Tehachapi for men and Valley State Prison for Women. Only a few women have ever been given a SHU term for gang activity.

All those identified as gang members by the administrative kangaroo court serve SHU terms without end. The only way out is to debrief, to testify against oneself to prison rules violations and crimes.
Prisoners have found it very hard to attack the abuses in the SHU, even though the U.S. is under the jurisdiction of the U.N. Convention Against Torture (CAT). The U.S. states reservations to the treaty asserting that the U.S. Constitution and body of law are all that is required to satisfy the obligations of CAT.

But the 1995 Prison Litigation Reform Act (PLRA) that prohibits a prisoner bringing action for mental or emotional injury without prior showing of physical injury is one law that violates CAT. The U.N. Committee on Torture expressed concern that by disallowing compensation for psychic abuse the PLRA is out of compliance with CAT.

Under CAT, torture includes “any act by which severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted.” But the U.S. 1990 reservations to CAT were designed specifically to allow solitary confinement, as the reservations state that mental pain and suffering must be prolonged, be tied to infliction or threats of infliction of physical pain, the result of drugging or the result of death threats.

Despite SHU confinement without end to attempt to control gangs, prison gangs thrive in California’s prisons. The gang leadership predictably uses the snitch sessions to falsely target their rivals, or just recruit new members. Just as we have seen in U.S. anti-terror investigations, information derived from coercion is often unreliable.

Using indeterminate total lockdown to extract confessions is torture by international standards, as is the use of prolonged solitary confinement. U.S. prison officials order by rule the torture of prisoners. One in 31 adults in the U.S. is under the supervision of the criminal detention system – jail, prison, probation or parole – with 2.5 million behind bars.

Prisons dominate the lives of poor communities and communities of color and are ignored by affluent white America. One in 11 African-Americans and one in 27 Latino-Americans are under penal jurisdiction. Prisoners damaged by incarceration are returning to communities increasingly less able to absorb them.

The 2005 census found that severe poverty increased 26 percent more than the overall growth in poverty. In 2002, 43 percent of the nation’s poor were living in severe poverty, the highest rate since 1975.

Torture has always served more to beat down a population than to extract reliable information. The unstated goal is to incapacitate and marginalize the dangerous poor who are locked out of America’s opportunity and riches. The routine even banal nature of torture in U.S. prisons enables torture to be acceptable, and informs our failing strategies of dealing with any opposition by using brute force.

A more useful way to undermine and blunt prison gangs would be to provide programs and procedures that enliven the community of prisoners with rehabilitative activity making them too busy and too hopeful to become involved. Drug and mental health treatment and education and vocational training rather than enforced idleness and despair will help change the culture of the prison yard from a battleground to a place for personal and social renewal. To be successful at a renewal behind bars, a revitalization of our poor communities is desperately needed.

I’ll never forget my visit to several prisons in the United Kingdom a number of years ago. I toured one of their high security units housing eight of the 40 men out of 75,000 considered too dangerous or disruptive to be in any other facility. The men were out of their cells at exercise or at a computer or with a counselor or teacher.

The goal was to get them back on mainline through rehabilitation, not terror. With embarrassment, the host took us to the one cell holding the single individual who had to be continuously locked down and cuffed and hobbled before exit from his cell. I was equally embarrassed to tell our guide that this is how 2.5 percent of U.S. prisoners are routinely treated.

Corey Weinstein, MD, CCHP, is a physician, a Certified Correctional Health Professional and a renowned advocate for justice behind enemy lines. He can be reached at coreman @ igc.org.

Coming to the Boscobel Supermax

By an inmate in WI

This essay was originally published at the FFUP website in 2005, but since the host will be closing down, we wanted to re-publish it here.

It was a dark, gloomy, overcast morning that greeted me as I awoke May 6, 2003. And the prognosis for the rest of the day didn’t appear to be any better. Because today was to my the last day in Racine Correctional Institution. I was due to depart to the Boscobel Supermax! Ever since I first had the fight, which landed me in the hole with a battery charge and I got 8 days seg, 360 days disciplinary separation, there had been a feeling of impending dread.

There was little doubt in my mind to what would be my fate. Often times I had hastily made that declaration in the heat of an argument- ‘I’ll be going to Boscobel Supermax and you’ll be going to Mercy Hospital.’ It was one of my favorite sayings. How could I know that it would become a self-fulfilling prophecy in a matter of days.

So here I was, stark naked in a cell at 5:30, I am preparing to leave. The stories about the place abounded, and although I had already done lots of hole time in lots of joints around the country, this place invoked thoughts of doom deep inside me. All those that were unfortunate enough to be headed for the Supermax were stripped, shackled, and placed in a transport van. It was pouring out as we struggled to board the van. The ride began slowly as we made our way out of the institution and no one said a word as we all looked out the window lost in our individual thoughts. My thoughts were that this really won’t be so bad. ‘Damn, I messed up.’

As we ventured down the back roads, the somber moods seemed to lighten and we began to comment on the different homes and vehicles we saw. Things really picked up as we made a pit stop at a gas station, that had several cute girls standing around. Surprisingly, we talked all the way there with very little room for pause.

As we neared the town of Boscobel, things began to tense up, you could fell it in the air, the only thing to relieve the tension was when we saw this black guy walking down the streets of a small town outside of Boscobel. The sign read: Boscobel 11 miles, as we crossed over the Wisconsin River, and we all began fading from the conversation to enter into our own thoughts. Once again, I was thinking how beautiful this area was, with its rolling hills full of trees, open plains full of crops and small valleys- I had never seen anything like it before. This is the perfect place to live- except if you are in Boscobel Supermax.

We turned off the two- lane highway and out across the town. There wasn’t too much to see until we headed toward another grove of trees only to discover that’s where they built the joint. Upon first glance it appeared to be like all the rest of the prisons I had seen, but upon closer inspection, the outside didn’t seem right. First of all, Boscobel doesn’t have any of the ascetic needs of other joints so its looks are as stern as the rest of it.

After an amusingly long and thorough search of the van we were allowed to proceed from the gatehouse to the sally port. An all I could think of was: ‘Who would want to sneak up on this joint? What a joke.’ Even the officers from RCI were amazed at the security measures. Once we reached the sally port, the doors opened and 6 or 7 Boscobel officers were standing there. The white shirt called out a name and one of the guys got off the van and was immediately surrounded by the Boscobel staff and taken into the building. It was really as extreme as it sounds. They literally all took hold of him, as if the cuffs, waistband, and shackles weren’t enough to restrain us.+

Then it was my turn. The same exact thing happened to me- every single guard placed his hand upon me as if I was Hannibal Lector!

Once inside, we were placed in strip cells and searched again. And from there they escorted me to my new home on alpha unit. There was an announcement over the PA that said two officers and one inmate were en route to Alpha. As I walked down a very long, brightly lit corridor, the officer instructed me not to look anywhere but straight ahead or else I would be taken down+ immediately.

We finally reach our destination: the alpha pod. I was placed in a cell in the fourth range. There was a concrete slab for a bed with a rather comfortable looking mattress; there were two cut away cubbyholes for storing personal items, a stainless steel toilet and sink combination which I always hate because of the cold on your butt when you flushed.

There were only two windows which one could peer out although there was little to see. I could look across from me into the adjacent room- a vestibule between two cells. But there didn’t seem to be anyone in there. The other window was a small cut on the wall which allowed access to the hallway. I could see only two other windows with the name of occupants posted under them.

After taking a nap, I heard some voices, which sounded as if it were right in the room with me. So I sprang up to discover I was alone and that the voices were coming out of the vents. Some guy with a harsh, crackling voice was calling me I think, ‘Hey, Young Blood.’ He said. I said, ‘I’m not no young buck dude- I’m 40 some years old.’ ‘Oh, I thought you were young, that’s why I said that,’ he responded. He told me who he was and gave me a crash course in how to do Supermax time. The things he said did help later on. But this was still about the most difficult time I’ve had to do and mainly it was because of the inmates- the kind of guys that get into the vent and talk for hours just crankin’ out.

Because of the sensory deprivation, things take on a new meaning. Just to see people was a big bonus even if they were just guards. To hear people talk about real events, since there were no newspapers, TV news or radio to keep you informed**, I know why so many guys go completely insane within this kind of environment. It’s because that’s what it’s designed to do- drive you crazy.

If I had not been for my faith in God, and through the help of some lovely people like FFUP, I might have lost my senses or lost my will to go on or to make the most of this situation. But I made it out of Boscobel and with the grace, mercy and love of God, I will soon make it home again.


+ taken down- tackled, pushed to the floor by all escorting guards- this is the ‘face forward policy’ and it causes much difficulty.

** Boscobel runs on a deprivation system called ‘the level system.’ Inmates are allowed more materials as they progress, although they never get to see or read local news and the TV channels are very limited. They only have a pen nib to write with. Even in the highest levels, this is a life of extreme deprivation.

Through The Looking Glass: A view inside Wisconsin’s Supermax

This essay was written and published on the Forum For Understanding Prisons (FFUP) website in 2006, and because the host will cease to exist, we re-publish it here.

By N. and M., prisoners in WSPF, Boscobel, Wisconsin

Given the crazed and hallucinatory results of confinement in WSPF’s (i.e Wisconsin Secure Program Facility) belly, my reference to Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in this title appropriate-although it has somewhat improved all too often we’ve observed inmates who’ve buckled under the immense psychological pressure and become: Raving Lunatics who lash out in any way (usually verbally, seldom physically) at anyone and anything (TV, themselves, staff, family, other inmates); paranoid recluses, delusional recluses, perverted exhibitionists, or suicidal.

This madness I’ve experienced myself (i.e. the paranoid and delusional brand, it’s the basic product of WSPF, apparently. I am not a psychologist. I can only analyze what I see and feel), caused by the sensory deprivation, lack of sunlight, separation from loved ones, severe social-segregation and (last but not least) mind/physical games and abuse by staff (e.g. slamming our traps and bolts and our doors, lying about us to keep us here, constantly creating new restrictions, tearing our cells apart and using pat and strip searches to harass us, putting us on ground food loaf and no clothing restrictions, giving our mail to other inmates, disciplining us for expressing our views in the mail, giving us dirt clothes, feeding us junk food and kiddie portions, letting other inmates harass us by yelling or banging on walls/doors constantly. Beating us.. You name it)- WSPF is surreal in a Steven King sorta way (well, maybe more in a Dean Koontz INTENSITY sorta way!) and its not something that can be blamed on the inmates, for we didn’t create it.

For those of you who are internet-savvy, we suggest that you go to: www.uscourts.gov to review some of the cases concerning WSPF (WSPF was formerly called SMI- Supermax Correctional Institution, the former warden was Gerald Berge, now it’s Richard Schneiter) – you’ll find some that are ridiculous (e.g. by one inmate who likes to play with his genitals for every female staff member to see) – and some that are appalling (e.g. by an inmate who got his wrist broken by Sgt R. T. for refusing to kneel to be to be shackled, even though the inmate couldn’t kneel because of a knee injury and he was permitted to forgo kneeling (note: WSPF is the only WI prison the requires all inmates to kneel and be shackled, regardless of their potential for violence). But the glorious 7th Circuit blew them off, sometimes by ignoring critical facts, other times by just refusing to apply the law- we know how it goes, because they’ve done it to me, Nate Lindell, personally.

But it’s not just the courts who don’t give a damn (sure, they occasionally pretend to care, appointing a friend of the judge to pose for the cameras while blatantly selling us out-a la Ed Garvey, where 90% of us class members wanted a trial but Judge Crabb and the 7th court forced a settlement on us) its the public that doesn’t care AT ALL about what’s going on at WSPF. Maybe the public doesn’t know what’s going on (wasn’t that the excuse of the populace surrounding the WWII concentration camps) of maybe they choose not to care because they think we’re all “the worst of the worst” as former Governor Tommy Thompson asserted. Maybe the populace surrounding WSPF doesn’t care because they think torture of us prisoners is…appropriate.

Whatever the reason for the ambivalence towards WSPF by the populace, its wrong. We’re not all “the worst of the worst” – few of us are unrepentantly evil. Although I’m (N.) a lifer, in prison because I killed someone while committing a burglary, I refuse to pursue a life of deviance, dishonorable behavior and self degradation- I did something foolish that can’t be fixed and hurt good people but that doesn’t mean I must continuously engage in criminal or evil behavior. I am more than a murderer- but WSPF does all it can to ensure we are criminal and nothing more.

As for my co-author (M.), “I am in here for burglarizing a house while people were away on vacation. I know that I did wrong but I did not hurt anyone, not would I have. I have spent most of my incarceration trying my utmost to educate myself and rehabilitate myself, despite the best efforts of WSPF to prevent that. I am a non-violent offender and will be getting out in 2 years.”

WSPF strips us of the humanity we have and some of us had little-(ALWAYS by no fault of our own-nobody’s born a sociopath but are made so) humanity in the first place. What sense does it make to torment and degrade people who’ve been tormented and degraded their entire life (such is both of our backgrounds. Both being abused and how amazing that we were able to come out of such lives), and smash any hope of becoming a fully developed human being?

By exposing guys to severe isolation and severe lack of physical interaction with other people. The coldness most of us learned at a young age stays with us. The psychologists here employ pills as the cure all end all and rarely engage in meaningful constructive help for inmates who refuse to take pills. Recently I spoke to a psychologist here, who told me that they only had to speak with inmates on clinical monitoring (pills) once a week and to those not on pills, once a month. And these “talks” only consist of either in front of your cell behind a steel door or behind a glass window in a no contact visit room, where we are handcuffed and some of us shackled.

My complaint about this is where is the social interaction necessary for anyone’s growth? By treating all of us as of we are wild animals, even if we don’t warrant such treatment, as most inmates rarely if ever display such behavior, but being labeled as such we become worse by the repetitive treatment by the staff and psychologists here, because the more a person is treated as if he is bad, the more he will believe that he is bad.

So due to the severe isolation and treatment of us as some how subhuman, we are lacking the emotional nurturing some of us need in order to teach us that we are not bad but chose to be. If there is a complete lack of empathy and love and want for us to succeed, I cannot reasonably see how anyone can justify the so-called programming here at WSPF.

The overwhelming vast majority of prisoners in all United State prisons come from dysfunctional homes where they were either treated very poorly or were out right abused and all in all, due to lack of nurturing we received as children, we grew up only looking out for ourselves. And since we had no one to love us, truly loved us, that is, teach us right from wrong, or to be there for us when we needed it the most, we developed survivalists’ behavior, that is – everyone for themselves. And since we did not have people to help us out or nurture us, we do not trust others and that that the only person who cares about us is ourselves, so we often times turn to other areas to fill the void we received growing up.

Some of us turned to stealing, lashing out against anyone to gain material prosperity and not caring what happens to them because no one cared what happens to us. Some of us joined gangs, looking for love and respect we did not receive at home. Some of us turned to drugs, to escape the lack of love we feel for ourselves and the world around us. The list of things we turn to is endless. But the point is, we, most of us anyways, become this way due to the lack of love and nurturing we received at home while growing up. Some may not have been our parents fault. Some of our parents may have been single parents who had to work all day to feed us and simply didn’t have time to spend with us and nurture us or teach us right from wrong. And some of our parents were either zoned out on drugs and cared only to be high and some were out and out abusive.

So what I am getting at is that how can anyone expect us to change our lives around and become productive, loving individuals if we never have been taught to be that way and we are not being taught that way here! And to add insult to injury, to be treated like we are a caged animal and no one here caring enough to take it upon themselves to do otherwise.

What is interesting about all that we have said relates to the programs here themselves. The programs here that they give us consist of them giving us a piece of paper with questions on it and having us watch a video that asks about the questions on the paper. The total lack of human empathy and contact by staff, the public, and programming here will virtually guarantee that little or no success will ever come out of WSPF. Because how can any of these so-called programs here be successful if they forget the most essential thing for our rehabilitation: our humanity.

Here’s an example of the guys we’ve met at WSPF, you decide if they’re “the worst of the worst”. M. (I’m here for threatening a supervisor); L. (he’s here, or was the last I knew, here for flashing a female guard); J. (he’s here for agreeing to have sex with a female staff member who found him attractive); S. (he’s here for having some skinhead literature); T. (he was here, for years, for trying to buy drugs); C. (he’s here because his DA recommended it, despite good behavior) R.D. B. (here for threatening staff), T. (here for selling cigarettes a guard brought in); J. (here for writing a book about a prisoner escaping).

The list could go on and on, most of these guys here have been here for years. N., I’m here because I stabbed some gang leader who threatened to stab me if I didn’t help him transfer money he extorted- I’m here, he isn’t. Once some of us arrive, we did engage in further rule violations (mostly due to being driven crazy) that is now cited to seal our lease at WSPF – but even this additional poor behavior doesn’t make us “the worst of the worst” unless, like WSPF administration, you are set on believing this.

Even if the public feels no ethical pangs about WSPF housing guys who really aren’t “supercriminals”, the public ought to care about WSPF sucking up unjustifiable amounts of its tax-dollars that OUGHT to be use to fund the UW system or any other productive US destructive government work for it costs AT LEAST twice as much to house an inmate at WSPF than it does to house them in a “normal prison. No big surprize, for at WSPF guards act as butlers and footmen, bringing us everything we need (food, clothing, meds, mail, etc,) and health costs are understandably higher for inmates who spend 24/7 in their cells alone. WSPF currently holds about 350 inmates, but there’s more than 100 vehicles out front! Yikes!

The sheer amount of money being spent to run this place can be offset by allowing inmates here to do some of the jobs the state pays staff here to do. This is the only institution in the state that doesn’t have inmates doing such as cooking, cleaning. laundry, mowing the lawn, janitorial etc. The state has to pay large fees for outside people to do these jobs, whereas if they allow inmates to have some of these jobs, the state could literally save millions of dollars that we could spend on things better than this.

Giving inmates jobs also give the inmates a sense of purpose and pride and gets inmate involved with becoming a responsible person, teaching them job skills, and taking pride in having a sense of accomplishment. And the out of the cell time would drastically improve morale of the inmates here.

Much more could be said about how Wisconsin as before WSPF (Supermax) was built. The inmates that were problematic were put in segregation units for long periods of time, but had a much greater opportunity for release from this status than inmates at WSPF. As shown by the report filed by Walter Dickey, December 20, 2005, who is the monitor in the case brought against Wisconsin’s DOC (Department of Corrections) the monitor reports that inmates are being over- classified to WSPF simply to fill bed space. Meaning that the DOC is sending people there who shouldn’t be there!

So this is the proof that some officials have little intent to release inmate here, but plan on keeping them solely to justify keeping this place, not to mention the cozy jobs this place provides and the state and federal money being put into city of Boscobel and Grant county for the upkeep of this prison.

WSPF has experienced some exposure as a crazy-maker, boondoggle-pushed by a former Governor with feeling of inadequacy who instead of buying a mustang built a supermax (like the kids in Texas and California)-so now calls itself a “program facility” and prison officials had told the media how it’s now a changed prison. Nothing has changed but some names- the “level system ” is now called a “phase system” and inmates are still kept at WSPF for years longer, based on “warnings” or merely having a “poor attitude”. Secret meetings are held where decisions are made to promote/demote inmates to different level phases. We are not even told who types the decisions/what we must do to leave or avoid demotion or who’s making accusations against us.

They tell us that they are going to have a meeting to review whether we will be advanced to a higher phase and we have no opportunity to speak on our behalf at such meetings to refute any unfounded allegations against us at these meetings. We are only told that such meetings are going to take place. Then they give us a slip stating that our so-called evaluations, and for some the so-called bad conduct listed on it we did not have the ability to refute, is for example: they said that one inmate’s cell smells badly, they told another that he needed a hair cut, they told another that he made inappropriate gestures to staff (without any staff telling him he was doing so or what the gestures were) and the list goes on from here.

Now how is it possible that inmates here are determined a threat for having long hair or if their cells smells badly? What does either have to do with threatening or dangerous behavior that so-called warrants the stay for inmates here?

Then the same sheets tell us we have to do certain programs that I described above, (that is a piece of paper and a video to watch) they tell us that we have to do these programs, and we do them, and we still are not advanced! Some inmates here have done ALL the programs here and yet they remain where they are.

We still do not get contact visits. We get no more than 2 (!) hours a week in the dog kennel outside recreation cages. We can only have up to 10 publications (all other Wisconsin prisoners can have 25) we can’t work and earn money. We’re stuck in our cells 24/7 subject to screams of those who can’t handle the stress. We have staff looking to make us crazy, slamming our traps, lying about us and bragging about their schemes to justify their cozy jobs. It’s amazing to us that ANY prisoners here would have any respect for the “system” or give a damn about obeying ethics that the system itself ignores.

A way back, as some may recall, a lot of WSPF inmates were released due to their mental health problems. Some, (including me, N., due to paranoid and mood disorders) were sent to Wisconsin’s Resource Center (WRC) which also employed a “level system ” WRC’s level system, unlike WSPF’s had inmates moseying around out doors within 2 weeks-it only went downhill for me after I (Nate) was moved to a unit with violent inmates (apparently because I wrote many group complaints or suits for others/where a guy who hated whites attacked me and another threatened to stab me. But the point is, WSPF’s level system (now Phase-) system has no intention of releasing us to general population conditions-it takes years to get to walk around. Yet at WRC it takes weeks! As social interaction is critical to rehabilitation, yet WSPF blatantly denied his, with no justification-WSPF’s labeling itself as a “program” is just an attempt to hide the reality from the public. Indeed D.J. and I are on a “long-term administrative confinement ” and must do AT LEAST two more years at WSPF despite our sterling behavior for years!

Much more could be said about WSPF. E.g. how all of the staff end up marrying each other and act as a crime family, squeezing protection from the taxpayers and pain from prisoners; how even the tinyest of misconduct is the basis for severe abuse and degradation; how staff lie about us to keep us here. However, one can’t appreciate all of this unless they go through it.

What we’d like the recipients of this letter to do is come up here, contact the guys noted in this letter, just set up your cameras and microphones in the hallway for a few days- ask the crazed inmates Why they ask like they do. Ask the administration why they impose all the hardships on us (it has no legitimacy in behavior modification psychology- punishment is far less effective than rewarding good behavior). Maybe then you’ll agree with us that if rehabilitation of inmates is truly desired the following needs to occur for all WSPF inmates:

  1. An end to abuse and punishment
  2. personal analysis of who we are, what got us in prison, what we are seeking and can rationally expect.
  3. Diverse, intense job-training
  4. Diverse, intense social training
  5. Excessive outdoor exercise
  6. Diverse, intense education
  7. Employ a level system identical to that used at WRC.

June 12th 2006

A gulag of our own

Comparing WSPF with other US control unit prisons: A gulag of our own

By a WI Prisoner

Note: this essay was written in 2005, for the FFUP Newsletter Bridge of Voices. The host of this site will soon cease to exist, that is why we re-publish this here.

The dearth of inmates who actually fit the WSPF criteria of ‘assaultive to staff’, gang leadership, and ‘escape artists’, shows the folly of continuing to maintain a very costly facility in the subsequent era of fiscal deficit. The cost rises when almost all work, kitchen, maintenance, laundry, etc. must be performed by highly paid staff instead of the routine prison practice of having this work done by inmates of the rate of 15 to 30 cents per hour. With the DOC budget approaching One Billion dollars, can the electorate continue to support this ‘white elephant’ tucked in the southwest corner of the state?

One activist, L. F., points out other problems in this abhorrent correctional system, surely an extension of slavery, not withstanding the 13th amendment: a high percentage of inmates are Black or Hispanic (as opposed to their representation in the general population of WI) whereas ALL the correctional officials at Boscobel are white. Visits for most inmates are facilitated only by teleconference, hardly worth the trip from Milwaukee.

The free bus has recently been eliminated. One inmate writes: ‘This is the loudest unit (level3). I’ve been in since arrival. It’s been a few weeks since my level four hearing but I’m still here. NOT promising, I’m afraid. But the reason I’ll be given, if not promoted, will be fun.’ This guy was demoted to 3 for purportedly not turning in a library book in time.

One of the goals of a little grassroots prison reform group, Forum for Understanding Prisons (FFUP), is the education of the electorate on the abuses inherent in the administrative segregation management style at WSPF. With this in mind, they have conducted a national survey of other ‘Control Type’ supermax facilities, including the federal ADX facility in Colorado. In many ways, the results show that Wisconsin’s Gulag is one of the worst and most punitive of the US states. Let’s take a look at the ‘state of the art’ facility in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. (although no prisoner, including Unabomber Ted Kaszynnski can see the mountains). In contrast to WSPF, the inmates have: network , cable, and educational TV, whereas WSPF has 3 channels for religions and educational use. MSNBC has been eliminated. Meals in Colorado include hot breakfast. coffee, tea and fresh fruit. The Federal judge (Crabb) in WSPF lawsuit declined to prohibit ‘nutraloaf’-use in WSPF, an amalgamation of leftovers used to punish recalcitrant inmates. ADX has a shower stall in each cell that can be used anytime, whereas WSPF has limited use to three short periods per week even though the stalls are in the cells. In ADX the inmates can possess a multitude of property: books , shoes, pictures. sweat clothes; caps and gloves; whereas WSPF has few such allowable items. Recreation at ADX is offered 6 times per week with as many as 12 fellow prisoners. Although there is ‘recreation’ at WSPF, it means going to another very small cell, with no equipment, no water or toilet, and a ‘window’ in the ceiling that lets in only light (update: as per WSPF lawsuit. there have been installed outside cages for recreation).

An inmate writer from Red Onion Supermax Facilty in Pound Virginia, complained of use of stun gun devices and this is a situation that has not been repeated at WSPF. He cites the death of a 50 year old man thereafter being shot with a taser devise. In Wisconsin, deaths are not routinely disclosed and families have no details available as to circumstances, although there is a bill in the legislature that would create an independent board to investigate all death. At present, there is no accountability to families, legislators or citizen-electors.

The respondents from Dade County Correctional Institution in Florida cite poor medical and psychiatric care. This same problem is endemic at WSPF and cited on the Federal case by Attorney Ed Garvey: ‘It makes absolutely no sense to have a mentally ill inmate entombed in a cell.’ Those on psychotropic medications are increasingly sensitive to heat: the temperature at WSPF routinely exceeds 90 degrees F in summer. Until AC is installed (if ever), the DOC is instructed to pass out cups of ice but the once a day routine is teasingly inadequate.As a result of the Garvey lawsuit against SPF, there has been an air conditioning unit installed and an outdoor recreation unit built, and some of the mentally ill inmates have been removed, although the definition of mentally ill remains very limited.

Michigan has a ‘supermax’ behavior modification control unit complex located in Munising, a rural location and the respondent cites the same ‘stale, dusty, recycled air’ problem as we have at WSPF These sealed environments are invariably cold in winter and hot in summer. He states a ‘central air system’ is activated in summer. Michigan has a second high risk security prison in IONIA (L6). The respondent cites lack of accountability of staff (falsifying ‘refusals’, etc.), adverse cell conditions, lack of access to Rec. and Law Library, and withholding of food as punishment, all complaints heard at WSPF. In contrast, they have desks in their cells and access to private TV at some levels and the Michigan co-pay is 3 dollars, compared to 7.50 copay at WSPF.

One of the most notorious secure housing units (SHU) is the Pelican Bay SHU facility on the rural north coast of CA. The respondent decries lack of human contact, necessity to ‘snitch’ to get removed from most restrictions, no sunlight but , as opposed to WSPF- no camera in cell. (at WSPF some cells have cameras, not all- this was a change required by the lawsuit). He cites a small 10 by 20 recreation yard, actually concrete with 20 foot high plastic walls. This is what the inmates at WSPF have to forward to if their outdoor recreation facilities are ever opened to them Another problem at Pelican Bay is difficulty of access to local courts. When a staged fight between two opposing gang-oriented inmates was recorded on videotape and leaked to the press by a disgruntled guard, the subsequent lawsuit fell on deaf ears in the local court. When several of the co-conspirator guards were indicted, the local jury was quick to exonerate as the town’s economy is wholly dependent of the prison payroll.

In Wisconsin, only a few inmate (pro-se) lawsuits have reached the court of appeals level. Most are dismissed at the circuit court level in Dane Co. (DOC Headquarters) or Grant Co., the location of WSPF. Inmate B. Freeman tried to challenge his transfer to WSPF in a suit against Warden Berge but was dismissed on numerous procedural technicalities, dealing with ‘administrative remedies’ and time constraints. Inmate M. challenged the behavior modification and mail policy at WSPF and met with limited success. The prison litigation Reform Act (both Federal and State) precludes easy access to the courts to either challenge conditions of confinement, administrative rules, or even matters related to conviction. Whereas previously an ‘indigent’ inmate litigator could get a waiver of filing fees, that is no longer available (except to out of state prisoners) forcing a petitioner to allocate a years salary (150 dollars) to gain a hearing before a circuit court judge. ‘pay me now or pay me later’ is the mantra. A free citizen would be charged only a days pay.

Thus, the only real way to challenge the oppressive conditions at the various supermax prisons are with the help of watchdog groups such as the ACLU. The recent victory in Federal Dist court of WI in reassessing some procedures at WSPF was assisted by the ACLU. In New Mexico, the ACLU was instrumental in achieving a ‘settlement’ via lawsuit which addressed some of the same abuses seen at WSPF: lack of mental health assessment for inmates, specific screening criteria, and added staff.

The FFUP survey also looks at supermax prisons in TN, DE, VA, KS and MD. One inmate in MD write that, after 22 years, he still feels anger, anxiety, periods of rage, hallucinations, claustrophobia, insomnia, and loss of appetite. He states various rationales for taking inmates to the supermax (MCAC) as ‘those with enemies, assaultive behavior, or too many rule infractions.’ He laments loss of all personal property once admitted to MCAC. The same is true at WSPF where most inmate property gets sent out or destroyed upon reception. Upon release (to max), one has to start all over in acquisition of allowable personal property.

Many of the conditions at the nation’s supermaxes are summarized by the Coalition for Prisoner’s Rights in Sante Fe, NM. They state ‘from the beginning, control units have relied on sensory deprivation. People are confined in tiny cells, the size of a parking space (think: living in your bathroom) for 24 hours a day. Educational or therapeutic programming is nonexistent.’ Although WSPF has a CGIP program, they use the worst of the control unit techniques in strip searches, shackling, and isolating prisoners. The Coalition correctly states: ‘It is largely the most vulnerable prisoners who end up in extended isolation who may well be the least able to withstand its rigors and are most susceptible to complete mental breakdown or suicide.’ This indeed is a terrible legacy established at WSPF under the authority of the people of the state of Wisconsin.

Is this responsible use of taxpayer resources? The Wisconsin Catholic Conference calls this issue one of the ‘common good.’ The simple question is: ‘what did we get in public benefits as a result of expenditure of this money?’ It costs twice as much to house an inmate at WSPF as it does in a regular WI prison- 26 thousand a year to about 56 thousand (2001 figures). Are we safer? Most of these inmates will be returned to society after years of isolation, filled with rage and unmet needs. Would we be better off with a humane system that mandates treatment and retraining?

A disproportionate amount of DOC spending occurs as a result of this misguided attempt to ‘micromanage’ WSPF’s 300-some prisoners. With a mandated 4% cut by the Doyle administration for all state agencies, the DOC has to squeeze its other agencies to maintain WSPF employment levels. Nice work if you can get it, notwithstanding the not uncommon reports of domestic abuse in WI Co. families.

The future of WSPF needs to be reassessed at all levels by citizens and their watchdog groups concerned with realistic stewardship of state budget money and humane treatment of incarcerated individuals.

Other than the removal of the most obviously mentally ill inmates, and the change of status to a maximum level institution, WSPF conditions remain the same as before the lawsuit, thought by many to be among the worst in the nation. With the status change to maximum, inmates can be housed at WSPF with less due process, and the floodgates are open. Most people still call it ‘the supermax’ however, because conditions are like those of a supermax.

Other than to tear the place down, WSPF could be converted to a regular maximum facility with school, recreation and library. Or convert the facility to a training center for DOC recruits, keeping 125 inmates under close supervision, yet let them interact with staff-in –training so each group can establish better understanding of their role in the life of our own little gulag in rural Wisconsin.

In the final analysis, we are forced to admit that we may have the worst punitive facility, supermax or otherwise, in the nation (I’ll look it up) once commented: ‘you can judge the degree of civilization of a society by looking at its prisons.’ We have to do better.

Link to Warren Lilly’s Forced Feeding Video

Isthmus article of June 18, 2009

Here are the snippets of the forced feeding of Warren Lilly, taken from Isthmus:

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=5205079&server=vimeo.com&show_title=1&show_byline=1&show_portrait=0&color=&fullscreen=1

Lilly- “Idiot’s Club” from The Daily Page on Vimeo.

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=5205539&server=vimeo.com&show_title=1&show_byline=1&show_portrait=0&color=&fullscreen=1

Lilly- talk with “Seaweed” from The Daily Page on Vimeo.

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=5208018&server=vimeo.com&show_title=1&show_byline=1&show_portrait=0&color=&fullscreen=1

Lilly – 2/28/09 breakfast “stop this” from The Daily Page on Vimeo.

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=5220114&server=vimeo.com&show_title=1&show_byline=1&show_portrait=0&color=&fullscreen=1

Lilly – 2/28/09 Breakfast “Oscar Mayer” from The Daily Page on Vimeo.

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=5220741&server=vimeo.com&show_title=1&show_byline=1&show_portrait=0&color=&fullscreen=1

Lilly – “Lavern and Shirley reruns” from The Daily Page on Vimeo.